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risk of mrsa in mouth after dental extraction
Started by caroline
Posted: September 19, 2006 at 19:53
i work in ward with several cases of mrsa, could i get this in the open wound in my mouth after having my tooth removed
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Re: risk of mrsa in mouth after dental extraction
Reply #1 by Sue
Posted: September 22, 2007 at 10:22
If you are a nurse, you should know that MRSA is spread by touch and is not airbourne transmissable! I suggest you consult Occupational Health, who will be able to clarify this for you
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Re: risk of mrsa in mouth after dental extraction
Reply #2 by Maria
Posted: September 22, 2007 at 16:11
Hi Caroline
As Sue has said you need to go to Occupational Health who will advise on what you should do until the wound site has healed.

MRSA is airborne, and we do know of someone working in a healthcare environment who has it in their lungs, they have not had any surgery or invasive procedures. The importance of using PPE cannot be stressed enough.
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Re: risk of mrsa in mouth after dental extraction
Reply #3 by Steve
Posted: September 23, 2007 at 09:35
Not airborne?, I thought MRSA attached itself to dust, or even when people coughed if it's in their throat

The amount of people who seem get infected by the MRSA piggybacking chest infections in our local hospital, would certainly point to the stuff being airborne.
Course they are embarrassed about it and try to say "err it's only a chest infection, or a tummy infection for c diff" at first.
But soon break down, and let it all flow out, when you tell them what it is, people need not be embarrassed about this, but the hospitals like it that way, from where I'm standing.


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Re: risk of mrsa in mouth after dental extraction
Reply #4 by Ruth Wollacott
Posted: September 23, 2007 at 09:44
MRSA can be airborne and wearing facemasks would prevent such transmission.

Just to clarify: it is not necessary for all patients and visitors to wear facemasks at all times - let's start with NHS staff who have close contact with open wounds wearing a facemask while treating/changing the wound or dressing.

Or explain how people can become infected with MRSA in their lungs without having surgery or any kind of invasive procedure? It is likely to be a person (or being looked after) in a healthcare setting. The implication is that the MRSA has been breathed INTO the lungs and made a cosy home. The further implication has to be that MRSA can also be breathed OUT of the lungs and into a wound or up the nose of someone else. Remember the war time saying 'Coughs and sneezes spread diseases'.
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